Is Stem Cell Research Legal in US

          Since the stem cell research have a lot of controversy, in each part of this world has it’s own way regarding to the legality of stem cell research, we will refer again in this article, is stem cell research legal in US, we choose first only US because if we discuss in all over the part of this world, it will be a very very long article, and won’t be funny if we read that until the end of our time, isn’t it…? :)

        Stem cell laws and policy in the United States have had a complicated legal and political history.

Is Stem Cell Research Legal in US

Legalization
S1909/A2840 is a bill that was passed by the New Jersey legislature in December 2003, and signed into law by Governor James McGreevey on January 4, 2004, that permits human cloning for the purpose of developing and harvesting human stem cells. Specifically, it legalizes the process of cloning a human embryo, and implanting the clone into a womb, provided that the clone is then aborted and used for medical research. Missouri Constitutional Amendment 2 (2006) (Missouri Amendment Two) was a 2006 law that legalized certain forms of embryonic stem cell research in the state. (source : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stem_cell_laws_and_policy_in_the_United_States)
Current federal policy on stem cell research:
In the 113th Congress, Reps. Diana DeGette (D-CO-01) and Charlie Dent (R-PA-15) sponsored H.R. 2433, also known as the Stem Cell Research Advancement Act, which would codify the stem cell rules established under President Obama’s executive order, preventing future administrations from unilaterally restricting or eliminating federal funding for stem cell research. The legislation would permit funding for research on stem cells derived from embryos produced, but ultimately not used, for in vitro fertilization. There was no companion Senate bill.
On August 23, 2012, in a decision favorable to proponents of embryonic stem cell research, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit upheld a lower court ruling dismissing a lawsuit that challenged the Obama administration’s expansion of federal funding for embryonic stem cell research.
The Supreme Court declined to hear the appeal in an announcement on January 7, 2013. The announcement allows the decision of the appeals court to stand.
The 114th Congress has not taken further action to overturn or to affirm President Obama’s executive order, but the debate continues in the states. In Oklahoma, at the beginning of February 2015, a bill banning all embryonic stem cell research cleared committee for consideration by the full House. The Oklahoma legislature had approved a similar bill in 2009, but failed to override the governor’s veto. (source : http://www.researchamerica.org/advocacy-action/issues-researchamerica-advocates/stem-cell-research)

You may also like...